Loggerhead Shrike

   
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Southern California ABA Tour
Jan 12-17, 2005, Outstanding weather!
Guide- Bob Miller

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174 species total

Click on thumbnail pictures for full-sized shots.

Day 4 - Saturday (continued)


LeConte's Thrasher sighter


LeConte's Thrasher

 

We had great looks at a pair of LeConte's Thrashers and got to watch them run across the dunes.  Black-tailed Gnatcatcher, Verdin and Loggerhead Shrike were a few of the other residents we saw.  Tracks tell stories in the sand and we had been tracking the LeConte's Thrashers before we found them. Fresh Coyote tracks told us we were not the only ones being watched that morning!


LeConte's Thrasher

 


Brittlebush

Blooming Brittlebush were a hint of the colors that would explode in the deserts in a few weeks when all of the new vegetation bloomed.  We left only our tracks in the sand while other things left in the sand told of less thoughtful visitors long past..



Antiques!?

Days 5 - Sunday

Cattle Call Park gave us nice looks at this Anna's Hummingbird. Heading west we stopped off at Poe Road for a last look at the Salton Sea.


Anna's Hummingbird


Salton Sea at Poe Road

We made our way back to Borrego Springs to find some reported Lawrence's Goldfinch, a specialty high on everyone's list that can be a little hard to predict. A stop to view Costa's Hummingbird in a friends yard was great because he happened to be home and showed us exactly where to find the goldfinches!  Thanks Paul!!


Borrego Springs

After a stop at the Anza Borrego Desert SP we climbed out of the deserts on Montezuma Grade with it's breathtaking views.  The Salton Sea can be seen at the base of the farthest mountains.

Our last bird of the trip was the only American Robin we saw on the trip.  That was just after we had great looks at Pygmy & White-breasted Nuthatches, Oak Titmouse and Mountain Chickadees at about 6,000 feet in the Laguna Mountains.

Photos Bob Miller